Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 2

This is an excerpt from the article, “CPSC Issues Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers  For more info, please visit http://www.cspc.gov.

For safest operation, CPSC staff recommends that consumers follow these guidelines as they prepare to use a turkey fryer:

  • Make sure there is at least 2 feet of space between the liquid propane tank and fryer burner.
  • Place the liquid propane gas tank and fryer so that any wind blows the heat of the fryer away from the gas tank.
  • Center the pot over the burner on the cooker.
  • Completely thaw (USDA says 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds) and dry turkey before cooking. Partially frozen and/or wet turkeys can produce excessive hot oil splatter when added to the oil.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to determine the proper amount of oil to add. If those are not available:
    • Place turkey in pot
    • Fill with water until the turkey is covered by about 1/2 inch of water
    • Remove and dry turkey
    • Mark water level. Dump water, dry the pot, and fill with oil to the marked level.

Thanksgiving Safety Tips

This is an excerpt from the article, “Thanksgiving Safety Tips  For more info, please visit http://www.oregonredcross.org.

Thanksgiving Day has more than double the number of home cooking fires than an average day according to the U.S. Fire Administration. In fact, each year more than 4,000 fires occur on Thanksgiving Day.

To help prevent home fires this Thanksgiving, the Red Cross suggests the following tips:

  • Keep potholders and food wrappers at least three feet away from heat sources while cooking
  • Wear tighter fitting clothing with shorter sleeves when cooking
  • Make sure all stoves, ovens, and ranges have been turned off when you leave the kitchen
  • Set timers to keep track of turkeys and other food items that require extended cooking times
  • Turn handles of pots and pans on the stove inward to avoid accidents
  • Follow all manufacturer guidelines regarding the appropriate use of appliances
  • After guests leave, designate a responsible adult to walk around the home making sure that all candles and smoking materials are extinguished

Even with the best preparation and precautions, accidents can happen. Thanksgiving is high time for cooking related burns. Minor burns can be treated easily if you remember to save the butter for the rolls and not a burn. For a superficial burn, cool the area by running it under cold water until the heat eases and then loosely cover the burn with a sterile dressing.

Another danger that can interrupt a good turkey dinner is choking. The most common cause of choking is talking while eating. If you feel as if food may be caught in your throat, never leave the room, stay where others can see you and help if your airway becomes blocked.

To help someone who is choking, remember “FIVE-and-FIVE Can Keep Them Alive.” First, ask the person if they are able to breathe and if you can help. Once you know the person is unable to cough, speak or breathe, have someone call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number, lean the person forward and give FIVE sharp back blows with the heel of your hand. If the obstruction isn’t dislodged, give the person FIVE quick, upward abdominal thrusts. If you are alone, you can perform abdominal thrusts on yourself, just as you would on someone else. Thrusts can also be administered by pressing your abdomen firmly against an object such as the back of a chair.

Just because we get to take a break from dieting on Thanksgiving, doesn’t mean we can throw caution to the autumn winds. Remember these suggestions and have a happy and safe holiday.

 

Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 1

This is an excerpt from the article, “CPSC Issues Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers  For more info, please visit http://www.cspc.gov.

CPSC Issues

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is issuing safety tips for preventing fires and burns when using turkey fryers. Since 1998, CPSC has reports of 75 incidents that involved fires, flames, or burns associated with turkey fryers. Twenty-eight of these incidents were reported for the year 2002. Here are some of the hazard scenarios:

  • House fires associated with turkey fryers leading to injuries and property damage.
  • Ignition of oil used with turkey fryers. This was often related to oil reaching excess temperatures or oil contacting the open flame of the fryer.
  • Splashing of hot oil causing burns.

The majority of reported incidents occurred while the oil was being heated, prior to adding the turkey. For this reason, it is very important consumers monitor the temperature of the oil closely. If any smoke at all is noticed coming from a heating pot of oil, the burner should be turned off immediately because the oil is overheated.

There is a risk of injury resulting from splashing due to the cooking of partially frozen meats. Thoroughly thaw and dry ALL meats before cooking in hot oil. One reported burn incident occurred when partially frozen chicken wings were added to hot oil in a turkey fryer.

CPSC staff is working with industry and voluntary standards organizations to improve the safety standard for turkey fryers.

CPSC staff recommends consumers who choose to fry turkeys follow the following safety guidelines:

  • Keep fryer in FULL VIEW while burner is on.
  • Place fryer in an open area AWAY from all walls, fences, or other structures.
  • Never use IN, ON, or UNDER a garage, breezeway, carport, porch, or any structure that can catch fire.
  • Raise and lower food SLOWLY to reduce splatter and avoid burns.
  • COVER bare skin when adding or removing food.
  • Check the oil temperature frequently.
  • If oil begins to smoke, immediately turn gas supply OFF.
  • If a fire occurs, immediately call 911. DO NOT attempt to extinguish fire with water.

Candle safety tips

This is an excerpt from the article, “Candle Safety Tips  For more info, please visit http://www.nfpa.org.

Candle safety tips     

Candles may be pretty to look at but they are a cause of home fires — and home fire deaths. Remember, a candle is an open flame, which means that it can easily ignite anything that can burn.

 
Download NFPA’s candle safety tips (PDF, 792 KB)
  • Blow out all candles when you leave the room or go to bed. Avoid the use of candles in the bedroom and other areas where people may fall asleep.
  • Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.
  • Think about using flameless candles in your home. They look and smell like real candles.

If you do burn candles, make sure that you… 

  • Use candle holders that are sturdy, and won’t tip over easily.
  • Put candle holders on a sturdy, uncluttered surface.
  • Light candles carefully. Keep your hair and any loose clothing away from the flame.
  • Don’t burn a candle all the way down — put it out before it gets too close to the holder or container.
  • Never use a candle if oxygen is used in the home.
  • Have flashlights and battery-powered lighting ready to use during a power outage. Never use candles.

Cooking Safety Tips

This is an excerpt from the article, “Cooking Safety Tips  For more info, please visit http://www.nfpa.org.

Cooking safety tips

Cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries. The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking. It’s important to be alert to prevent cooking fires.

 
Download these NFPA safety tips on cooking. (PDF, 171 KB)
  • Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stovetop.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — away from your stovetop.

If you have a cooking fire

  • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire.
  • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
  • If you try to fight the fire, be sure others are getting out and you have a clear way out.
  • Keep a lid nearby when you’re cooking to smother small grease fires. Smother the fire by sliding the lid over the pan and turn off the stovetop. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled.
  • For an oven fire turn off the heat and keep the door closed.

Employer Traffic Safety Program Part 3

This is an excerpt from the article, “Our Driving Concern – Employer Traffic Safety Program.”  For more info, please visit http://www.nsc.org.

 

What You Can Do

Implement a Corporate Cell Phone Ban
Driver distractions cost the U.S. economy more than $3.58 billion (Harvard Center for Risk Analysis Study) each month. In an effort to protect employees and their finances, many employers are implementing corporate cell phone bans, which protect employees both on and off the job.

A corporate cell phone ban might ask employees to:

  • Turn off wireless phones or other devices before starting the car.
  • Inform clients, associates and business partners that calls will be returned when no longer driving.
  • Pull over to a safe location and put the vehicle in park if a call must be made.

99% of organizations that responded to an NSC survey with total cell phone bans saw no decrease in productivity.

Learn how to implement a corporate policy that bans cell phone use while driving.

Educate Your Staff on the Risks of Distracted Driving
Your staff will have many questions about a cell phone ban and the risks of distracted driving, so prepare yourself to answer them.

Promote Distraction-Free Driving

  • Announce Your Commitment to Employee Safety – Introduce your cell phone policy and emphasize how it will ensure a safe workplace. Distribute the policy and give employees time to read and react to it, then explain what the ramifications are if employees fail to adhere to the policy.
  • Create a 12-Month Safety Calendar – You should promote distraction-free driving all year, but build on momentum of safety events during logical times of the year, like April’s Distracted Driving Awareness Month.
  • Use Posters, Web Banners and Fact Sheets from NSC – The National Safety Council provides many resources to help promote the prevention of distracted driving. Our Cell Phone Policy Kit provides ready-to-use materials.

Safety Games and Activities for Your Family – part 5

This is an excerpt from the article, “It’s Safety Time! Safety Games and Activities for Your Family

 For more info, please visit www.safetyatohome.com.

Get Out!

Creating a family fire escape plan is essential to safety. Take a few minutes to draw a diagram of your home (you can download one here. Identify at least two exits from each room as well as a family meeting place away from the house. Remind your children that if they see or smell smoke, they should “go low” and crawl to the exit.

Walk with your kids into each room and ask, “How could you get out?” “Now imagine this door is locked shut, how could you get out?” “Imagine the window was locked how could you get out?” Make the game more fun by adding in some playful and silly examples that make them think of alternative exits, e.g., “A giant llama is blocking the door. How could you get out? An elephant is in the front hall. How else could you go?”

Race to the family meeting area and review the fact that the first thing they should always do in case of a fire is get out of the house and never go back inside for any reason.

*An important reminder for parents – In a real fire, you shouldn’t rely on your children to escape safely on their own. Part of your family escape plan should include an adult going to each child’s room and getting everyone out safely.

Employer Traffic Safety Program Part 2

This is an excerpt from the article, “Our Driving Concern – Employer Traffic Safety Program.”  For more info, please visit http://www.nsc.org.

Cognitive Distraction
Cell phone use while driving isn’t just a visual and manual distraction, but a cognitive distraction. In addition to taking their eyes and hands off the wheel, distracted drivers take their mind off the primary task of driving.

Drivers talking on cell phones miss half of the information in their driving environment.

Drivers using cell phones not only display slower reaction times and have difficulty staying in their lane, but also are less likely to see:

  • High and low relevant objects
  • Visual cues
  • Exits, red lights and stop signs

More information on cognitive distraction can be found in the National Safety Council’s white paper, “Understanding the Distracted Brain.”

Employer Costs
A Harvard risk analysis study estimated the annual cost of crashes caused by cell phone use to be $43 billion. In recent years, numerous plaintiffs have filed and won multi-million dollar actions against employers for injuries arising from negligent driving of an employee who was distracted by the use of a cell phone. Multitasking while driving may seem like a time-saving solution, but it isn’t worth the risk.

Safety Games and Activities for Your Family: Get Out

cute-kids

Get Out!

Creating a family fire escape plan is essential to safety. Take a few minutes to draw a diagram of your home (you can download one here. Identify at least two exits from each room as well as a family meeting place away from the house. Remind your children that if they see or smell smoke, they should “go low” and crawl to the exit.

Walk with your kids into each room and ask, “How could you get out?” “Now imagine this door is locked shut, how could you get out?” “Imagine the window was locked how could you get out?” Make the game more fun by adding in some playful and silly examples that make them think of alternative exits, e.g., “A giant llama is blocking the door. How could you get out? An elephant is in the front hall. How else could you go?”

Race to the family meeting area and review the fact that the first thing they should always do in case of a fire is get out of the house and never go back inside for any reason.

*An important reminder for parents – In a real fire, you shouldn’t rely on your children to escape safely on their own. Part of your family escape plan should include an adult going to each child’s room and getting everyone out safely.

 

This is an excerpt from the article, “It’s Safety Time! Safety Games and Activities for Your Family For more info, please visit www.safetyatohome.com.

Employer Traffic Safety Program Part 1

This is an excerpt from the article, “Our Driving Concern – Employer Traffic Safety Program.”  For more info, please visit http://www.nsc.org.

Distracted Driving

Distracted driving has become an increasingly large problem on our nation’s roadways in the last few years as cell phones have become more common in our day-to-day lives. In 1995, cell phone subscriptions covered only 11 percent of the U.S. population; in 2010, that number grew to 93 percent.

This has led to a substantial increase in cell phone use while driving. According to the National Safety Council, 23 percent of all crashes each year involve cell phone use, resulting in 1.3 million crashes nationally. Distractions, along with alcohol and speeding, are now leading factors in fatal and serious injury crashes.

What’s the Problem

Cell Phone Use While Driving
Cell phone use while driving is the No. 1 distraction behind the wheel. Almost 70 percent of the respondents to a AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety survey reported talking on a cell phone while driving during the previous 30 days. Researchers observing more than 1,700 drivers found that three out of every four drivers using a cell phone committed a traffic violation.

At any given daylight moment, 9 percent of drivers are talking on phones (handheld and hands-free).

Talking on a cell phone while driving makes you four times as likely to crash, and texting while driving increases your chances of a crash by up to 8 to 23 times. While a growing number of drivers are turning to hands-free devices, studies show hands-free devices provide no safety benefit. It’s the conversation, not the device, that creates the danger.