Occupational Noise Exposure – Is Your Workplace Too Noisy?

This is an excerpt from the article “Occupational Noise Exposure”. For more info, please visit www.osha.gov.

What are the warning signs that your workplace may be too noisy?

Noise may be a problem in your workplace if:

  • You hear ringing or humming in your ears when you leave work.
  • You have to shout to be heard by a coworker an arm’s length away.
  • You experience temporary hearing loss when leaving work.

Protecting Workers from Heat Stress – Symptoms of Heat Stroke

This is an excerpt from the article “Protecting Workers from Heat Stress”. For more info, please visit www.osha.gov.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke:

• May be confused, unable to think clearly, pass out,
collapse, or have seizures (fits)

• May stop sweating

Occupational Noise Exposure – How Does the Ear Work

This is an excerpt from the article “Occupational Noise Exposure”. For more info, please visit www.osha.gov.

How does the ear work?

When sound waves enter the outer ear, the vibrations impact the ear drum and are transmitted to the middle and inner ear. In the middle ear three small bones called the malleus (or hammer), the incus (or anvil), and the stapes (or stirrup) amplify and transmit the vibrations generated by the sound to the inner ear. The inner ear contains a snail-like structure called the cochlea which is filled with fluid and lined with cells with very fine hairs. These microscopic hairs move with the vibrations and convert the sound waves into nerve impulses–the result is the sound we hear.

Exposure to loud noise can destroy these hair cells and cause hearing loss!

What Is Occupational Noise Exposure?

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Every year, approximately 30 million people in the United States are occupationally exposed to hazardous noise. Noise-related hearing loss has been listed as one of the most prevalent occupational health concerns in the United States for more than 25 years. Thousands of workers every year suffer from preventable hearing loss due to high workplace noise levels. Since 2004, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that nearly 125,000 workers have suffered significant, permanent hearing loss. In 2009 alone, BLS reported more than 21,000 hearing loss cases.

Exposure to high levels of noise can cause permanent hearing loss. Neither surgery nor a hearing aid can help correct this type of hearing loss. Short term exposure to loud noise can also cause a temporary change in hearing (your ears may feel stuffed up) or a ringing in your ears (tinnitus). These short-term problems may go away within a few minutes or hours after leaving the noisy area. However, repeated exposures to loud noise can lead to permanent tinnitus and/or hearing loss.

Loud noise can also create physical and psychological stress, reduce productivity, interfere with communication and concentration, and contribute to workplace accidents and injuries by making it difficult to hear warning signals. Noise-induced hearing loss limits your ability to hear high frequency sounds, understand speech, and seriously impairs your ability to communicate. The effects of hearing loss can be profound, as hearing loss can interfere with your ability to enjoy socializing with friends, playing with your children or grandchildren, or participating in other social activities you enjoy, and can lead to psychological and social isolation.

The above is an excerpt from the article, “Occupational Noise Exposure.” For more information, please visit www.osha.gov.

Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe – Grill Safety

This is an excerpt from the article “Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe.” For more info, please visit www.safetyathome.com.

Backyard Safety

Keep grills at least 10 feet from any structure: Grilling mishaps cause more than 8,300 fires and send 3,000 people to the emergency room each year. Never grill indoors or near garages or porches, even if it’s raining.

Protecting Workers from Heat Stress – Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

This is an excerpt from the article “Protecting Workers from Heat Stress”. For more info, please visit www.osha.gov.

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

• Headache, dizziness, or fainting

• Weakness and wet skin

• Irritability or confusion

• Thirst, nausea, or vomiting

Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

This is an excerpt from the article “Protecting Workers from Heat Stress”. For more info, please visit www.osha.gov.

< Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

Heat Illness

Exposure to heat can cause illness and death. The
most serious heat illness is heat stroke. Other heat
illnesses, such as heat exhaustion, heat cramps and
heat rash, should also be avoided.
There are precautions your employer should take
any time temperatures are high and the job involves
physical work.
Risk Factors for Heat Illness

• High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure,
no breeze or wind
• Low liquid intake
• Heavy physical labor
• Waterproof clothing
• No recent exposure to hot workplaces

Home Safety Tips for Outdoor Spaces – Contain Clutter

This is an excerpt from the article “Home Safety Tips for Outdoor Spaces”. For more info, please visit the home and garden section of about.com.

• Contain Clutter:
• Falls are a leading cause of injury in the home, outdoors as well as inside. And a lot of falls happen as a result of tripping over clutter. Provide storage for clutter in the form of patio storage benches, or buy other outdoor furniture that provides storage as well.

• Store all yard and gardening equipment safely, making sure to keep all chemicals out of reach.

Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe – Wading Pool Safety

This is an excerpt from the article “Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe.” For more info, please visit www.safetyathome.com.

Empty small wading pools and remove all toys after children are through playing: Infants can drown in just a few inches of water. Floats, balls and other toys may attract children to the pool when it is unattended.

Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe – Always Check the Pool First if a Child is Missing

This is an excerpt from the article “Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe.” For more info, please visit www.safetyathome.com.

Always check the pool first if a child is missing: Child drowning is often a silent death that alerts no one with splashes or yells for help. Many drowning accidents happen when children have been missing for less than five minutes.